It’s morning. I boot up the pc and right after the inital daily processing of email messages I launch the last.fm player. On some days music is an afterthought. Other days almost require the rhythmic inspirations brought on by quality music. The player’s still trying to get station information. Hmm…server must be busy.

Rather than wait indefinitely for a connection or troubleshoot the player I turn instead to Pandora. Alas, as I arrive at the site I discover that Pandora, along with most other internet radio sites, is taking part in a Day of Silence. To bring attention to a situation which threatens the existence of internet radio, most internet broadcasters will be off the air today. Last.fm is not taking part in this Day of Silence so I can only assume that being unable to connect to a station earlier today was because of increased load on their servers.

I have spoken out in support of internet broadcasters and will continue to do what I can to help the fight to Save Net Radio.

By the way, our home internet connection has been out for several days. It has affected my posting ability and makes me how much I’ve come to rely on the Internet. On the bright side I have been extraordinarly productive in the offline world.

Have you, like the vast majority of other music listeners, grown tired of mainstream broadcast radio? Internet radio sites, such as last.fm and Pandora, offer a wonderful alternative to broadcast radio with a wealth of listening features. I know I’ve personally discovered a plethora of new music that I actually enjoy through these sites. These webcasters are completely legal and offer a way for those whose tastes have evolved beyond standards available on broadcast radio to discover new music without resorting to risky piracy.

I abhor piracy and strive to support artists I like. Internet radio allows music lovers like me to better determine who should receive my support.

However, if the Copyright Royalty Board and RIAA lobbyists get their way, Internet radio will be silenced. New fee structures would effectively raise rates for webcasters by 300 to 1,200 percent. Interestingly, these increases would only affect Internet radio. AM and FM broadcast radio would be left alone. The new fees are supposed to go into effect July 15, 2007.

I sincerely hope you join me and prevent this from happening. Savenetradio.org closely watches this situation and will allow you to get involved. Stay tuned as I plan on sharing updates and action items to help save net radio.

SaveNetRadio.org